Lang: enLang: el

Overview

The MA in “Black Sea and Eastern Mediterranean Studies: Culture and International Relations” is being offered by the School of Humanities, Social Sciences and Economics of the University Centre of International Programmes of Studies of the International Hellenic University.

The programme is based on an interdisciplinary approach to the study of the history and cultures of the Black Sea and the Eastern Mediterranean regions, offering two specialization streams: The “Archaeology and Cultures” Stream and the “International Relations and History” Stream.

The Black Sea region and the Eastern Mediterranean basin with their special geophysical and cultural characteristics, are gaining significance as a geopolitical link between Europe and Asia. The important natural resources and the crucial position of these regions at the hub of international routes have aroused the interest of many nations over the ages, leading to numerous events of great cultural and historical significance. The Black Sea and the Eastern Mediterranean constitute two great international gateways of considerable importance for Europe as well as for Asia and the East. Over the last few decades, research institutions and university departments all over the world have promoted research programmes concentrating on these regions with such rich scientific material.

The courses are taught exclusively in English. The academics teaching on the programme come from universities both abroad and in Greece.

With its two streams on “Archaeology and Cultures” and “International Relations and History”, the MA in “Black Sea and Eastern Mediterranean Studies: Culture and International Relations” provides specialized education in diverse areas of interest such as Archaeology, Ethnography, Historical Geography, Art, Religion, Mythology, History, International Relations, Politics and Diplomacy. The MA in “Black Sea and Eastern Mediterranean Studies: Culture and International Relations” promotes learning and teaching characterized by a diversity of teaching methods.

The MA in “Black Sea and Eastern Mediterranean Studies: Culture and International Relations” accepts, after a careful selection process, graduates of History, Archaeology, Social Sciences, Humanities, Political Sciences, Geography, International Relations, Theology, Journalism, Balkan, Mediterranean or Oriental Studies and other related subject areas, from Greek universities or equivalent institutions from abroad and from Technological Educational Institutions of related subject areas according to Law 4957/2022 and 4610/2019, as applicable.

Re-establishment PDF (in Greek)

Regulation PDF (in Greek)

Key facts
Info icon

Start date: October 2024 (Academic year 2024-25, winter semester)

Application deadline: 31 August 2024 (non-Greek applicants) / 30 September 2024 (Greek applicants) or until places are filled

Campus: Thermi, Thessaloniki

Duration/Mode: 3 semesters (full time) or 6 semesters (part time) / weekdays (also available in distance learning mode)

Taught language: English

Entry requirements: An undergraduate degree from a recognised University

Language requirements: IELTS (academic 6.5 and above), TOEFL (IBT, 95 and above) or TOEIC (745 and above) score, or a recognised by the Greek State certificate of proficiency in English of C1 level

Fees: 2,500€ (total)

How to apply: Please follow the instructions at the applications page

Programme announcement:
First intake: ENG | GR
Second intake: ENG | GR

Arrow bottom
Arrow bottom reverse
Testimonials
talk bubble
Person Image
Kamile Sulcaite
MA in Black Sea Cultural studies
-
It was one of the bests experience in my life. Before studies in this University I could not believe that it is possible to learn so many interesting and difficult things in one year.

Who can apply

Entry requirements: An undergraduate degree from a recognised University

Language requirements: IELTS (academic 6.5 and above), TOEFL (IBT, 95 and above) or TOEIC (745 and above) score, or a recognised by the Greek State certificate of proficiency in English of C1 level

Course content

First Semester

The core courses

The aim of this course is to familiarise the student with the historical and cultural geography specifically of the Black Sea region. The focus will be on the interaction between people and the Black Sea area during the ancient and Byzantine periods as well as the spread of culture in the region, the cartographic survey of this region in the above-mentioned periods and its contribution to historical and archaeological scientific issues.

Learning outcomes

Upon completing the course, the students will:

  • know the principles and objectives of the historical and cultural geography and be able to apply them in the Black Sea region for the ancient and medieval periods
  • be in a position to research the interaction between people and the surrounding area of the specific region and specific eras
  • be able to reconstitute the landscape of different regions within the Black Sea area during specific epochs and interpret the spatial and cultural changes which occurred in these regions
  • be familiar with the geographic and cartographic survey of the Black Sea area during the ancient and medieval periods and be able to use this knowledge both archaeologically and historically.

The military campaigns and policies of Alexander the Great led to the formation of a new world across Eurasia, both in political and cultural terms. Following the death of the Macedonian commander, the conquered areas were distributed to his so-called “diadochoi”, comprising the known Hellenistic Kingdoms. Being in constant war against each other, these kingdoms were the focal points of politics in the Eastern Mediterranean. From the 2nd c. BCE, most of these kingdoms were gradually incorporated in the Roman Empire.

The course aims at familiarizing the students with the basic aspects of the international relations, administration, economy and social structure of these kingdoms, by focusing on selected textual and archaeological sources, inscriptions and papyri. Similarly, reference is made to the roman period, particularly to the imperial provincial administration, the status of the Greek city-states under roman rule etc.

The course aims at introducing students to the basic theories of International Relations and bringing them into contact with the main thinkers that shaped the field of International Relations. The major theoretical currents of Political Realism, Rationalism/Liberalism, Revolutionism and Constructivism are presented with their fundamental axioms about the nature of international system, its principal actors and the directions that open up today. Within the context of the course there will be discussions on past and existing regional cooperation or integration efforts (e.g. the EU) and the practical dimensions that they have, particularly in the Black Sea and Eastern Mediterranean Region. The course will also introduce the students to some basic concepts of International Law (e.g. state sovereignty, international treaties, international organizations) and will draw from examples mainly from the history of the countries of the Black Sea and the Eastern Mediterranean Region.

The course aims at studying and analyzing the historical developments that took place in the Eastern Mediterranean and the Black Sea, at political and diplomatic level, from the 19th until the end of the 20th century, such as as the Cold War, the strengthening and the consolidation of Zionism in Palestine, the Cyprus Question, the Suez Question, as well as the role of the USSR and USA in the regions until the end of the bipolar era. The relationship between political power and economic development will include both the Great Powers and the rising nationalisms in the two regions. Special consideration will be given to topics that still dominate the political and diplomatic reality in current affairs.

Learning outcomes

Upon completing the course the students will have gained:

  • detailed knowledge of the Eastern Mediterranean modern and contemporary history.
  • ability to understand the importance of the relations between the national states and the two superpowers (USSR and USA) in the region, at political, diplomatic, economic and military level.
  • ability to interpret these relations and to relate them with the historical processes that took place in the Eastern Mediterranean and the Black Sea during the period examined.
  • familiarity with the contemporary history of the Eastern Mediterranean, more specifically the history of the so-called “Age of Bipolarism” or “Cold War”, the post-colonialist period, the post Cold war period and the period of the emergence or the renewal of religion-based political movements in the region (Islamic fundamentalism, Zionism, Christian-Zionism).
  • familiarity with the history of the so-called “Age of the Imperialism”, with the European grande politique (in the Eastern Mediterranean and out of it), with the emergent nationalism of the peoples of the region and with their struggles against colonialism.
  • In-depth study many of the most important questions in world political history, like the Eastern Question, the question of the Turkish Straits, that of Palestine, that of Cyprus and that of the Suez Canal.

Second Term

– Archaeology and Cultures Stream

Stream Elective Courses (4 out of 6)

The course examines and discusses the Black Sea and the Eastern Mediterranean regions, during the prehistoric period, starting from the Neolithic all through the Iron Age; It draws from all the major regions of the Black Sea and the Mediterranean’s coast and islands. The main goal of this course is the examination of archaeological data at the 3rd and 2nd millennium BC at the Black Sea and Eastern Mediterranean regions (NE Aegean, Cyclades, Crete and mainland Greece) along with the interactions of cultures in the wider East Mediterranean basin. The course is particularly concerned with issues relating to the habitation and the environment, land use and survival strategies, data settlements and material culture, the economy and trade, ideology and burial practices, management and social organization. These issues are approached mainly through archaeological data and recent archaeological finds in relation to the historical and social background of the Neolithic period, Bronze Age and Iron Age in each geographical unit presenting the central debates in the Black Sea and the Mediterranean prehistory research. In addition, the ancient civilizations of the Near East–Egypt, Assyria, Babylonia, the Hittites, and Canaanites will be examined. The course shall also treat topics as diverse as Hittite contacts with the Mycenaean Greeks, the topography of the Hittite capital, and various aspects of Hittite grammar and etymology.

Learning outcomes

Upon completing the course, the students will have:

  • gained a general coverage of Black Sea and Eastern Mediterranean prehistory, which spans from the Neolithic through the Iron Age, and draws from all the major regions of the Black Sea and Eastern Mediterranean’s coast and islands
  • comprehended the central debates in Black Sea and the Eastern Mediterranean prehistory, such as trade and interactions, rural economies, ritual, social structures, gender identities, monumentality, insularity, archaeometallurgy and the metals trade, stone technologies, settlement, and maritime traffic, as well as contemporary legacies of these region’s prehistoric past
  • been presented with diverse theoretical approaches so that they can identify, analyse and discuss multifaceted subjects based on an interdisciplinary approach.

The aim of the course is to investigate the preserved ancient and medieval settlements of the Black Sea area and their spatial organization as the urbanisation process continued, and the most significant buildings or other building remains. The course refers essentially to the Greek colonies and the subsequent cities of the Byzantine period. Moreover, this course examines the development of Greek and local Art in the Black Sea area during Antiquity.  Of particular interest are the significant forms of art found, such as painting, pottery/vase-painting and sculpture (in clay or marble) as well as metalwork. For this purpose, published archaeological finds from the Black Sea area will be examined, which make up important products of these arts and are indicative of the development of each of them in the ancient and Byzantine period. The course also examines the historical context of these works of art.

Learning outcomes

Upon completing the course the students will have gained:

  • knowledge of the most significant settlements of the Black Sea during the ancient and medieval periods which have been archaeologically researched and studied
  • ability to recognize the urban planning and the plans of the aforementioned settlements
  • familiarity with the most significant building activities which existed in those settlements, such as ancient temples, fortifications, workshops, public and private buildings, Byzantine temples, etc.
  • familiarity with the objects which were found in all of these settlements during the excavations, which provide significant data regarding the use of the buildings and the history of the settlements
  • knowledge of the development of basic art forms in the Black Sea area dating from the ancient and Byzantine era
  • ability to identify and date an ancient art work
  • ability to incorporate any work in its historical context and interpret it as a product of a typological development, as well as of a society with specific cultural and economic characteristics.

This course’s subject is the study of those mythological incidents, e.g. the Argonaut expedition, Hercules’ labours, wandering Odysseus, punished Prometheus in the Caucasus, etc., which associate the myths of Greeks with the Black Sea region. The comparative mythology, that is, the systematic comparison of myths from different cultures, seeks to discover underlying themes that are common to the myths of multiple cultures. Myths of the Black Sea region, both from the Greek and the local cultures shall be thoroughly examined in order to define their origin and their possible connection with actual historical events (Colonisation), distorted over many retellings. There will also be an approach to the religious life of the Black Sea population in Hellenistic and Roman times, through the study of Greek and local cults (Dionysus and Orpheus in Thrace, Apollo and Artemis in the Tauris Peninsula, Cybele/Mother of God, Attis and other Eastern deities, Egyptian cults). According to the myth-ritual theory, a myth is closely tied to rituals and it also provides a religious experience. This approach will be based on the study of written sources (inscriptions, literary sources) and archaeological evidence (sanctuaries, shrines, temples, votive offerings, religious articles).

Learning outcomes

Upon completing the course, the students will have gained:

  • knowledge on the legends of Greek mythology referred to or linked to the Black Sea region
  • ability to interpret these myths based on historical events, such as the Greek colonisation, the foundation of cities etc.
  • knowledge of which Greek and Eastern deities were worshiped in different parts of the Black Sea area during antiquity
  • knowledge on the known ancient sacral monuments of the Black Sea area, the most important published worship objects, such as votive offerings found there, and the texts of the ancient sources referring to the worship of deities and worship practices in the Black Sea region
  • ability to interpret these myths in conjunction to historical events, e.g. the Greek Colonisation, the foundation of cities, etc.
  • knowledge on religions and deity/ hero cults related to the Black Sea area
  • ability to identify the major sacral monuments from the Black Sea settlements, important religious artefacts (e.g. votive offerings), discovered during excavations and published. They will also learn to study written texts (inscriptions, literary sources) associated with religion and religious practices in the Black Sea region.

The subject of this course is the presence of the Graeco-Roman civilization in the Black Sea and the Eastern Mediterranean, as seen through material remains. It will examine the spread of Roman civilization in these areas, the succession from  Hellenistic to  Roman culture, and the development of a common artistic language throughout the Empire that allowed the transmission of specific messages from the Emperor to his subjects, and vice versa. It will provide an overview of  Roman civilization as formed in the Balkan –Danubian provinces and the Greek and Asia Minor provinces during the period of its great flourishment (2nd c. AD). During the Imperial period some of the major Greek cities maintained their institutions and their administrative autonomy, although under the provincial governor; besides the existing old cities (e.g. Athens, Argos, Sparta, Thessaloniki, Veroia, Ephesus, Miletus, etc.) new cities were established in the Greek mainland and the Asia Minor, as Roman colonies where Roman colonists were settled and organized on the model of the Roman cities of Italy, however, also adopting local features.

Learning outcomes

Upon completing the course, the students will have gained:

  • a spherical view of the Black Sea region and Asia Minor on grounds of history and artistic expression during the Hellenistic and Roman period
  • knowledge on the Romanization process in the Balkan-Danubian and the Greek and Asia Minor provinces
  • ability to examine Roman monumental architecture and sculpture (historical reliefs, portrait, etc.) and discuss their role within Roman society and the formation of local identities
  • ability to discuss topics such as strategies of ‘Remembrance’ in the Graeco-Roman provinces, Benefactions, Imperial propaganda, etc.

Within the framework of the course an outline of the main streams of the medieval culture developed around the Black Sea and the Mediterranean Basin will be given. The monumental topography of these areas will be examined focusing on the urban development of the coastal cities from the early Christian era to the Ottoman period. The examination of the area will be based on the testimony of the archaeological material, as well as on the standing monuments preserved in these regions. Several different types of monuments, both movable and immovable will be presented, such as fortifications, secular and religious monuments, works of art, mosaics, wall paintings, icons and minor arts, as the representative testimonials of the Byzantine and Islamic cultural heritage developed around the Black Sea and the Mediterranean Basin. During the course, the role of Constantinople, as capital and main political, economic, religious and cultural centre influencing the culture developed in the wider area inside and outside the borders of the Empire, will be highlighted.

Learning outcomes

Upon completing the course, the students will have gained:

  • spherical knowledge on Byzantine and Islamic Art and Architecture developed in the Black Sea and the Eastern Mediterranean Basin
  • ability to identify the local characteristics and particularities of the architectural monuments and works of art made in different areas around the Black Sea and the Eastern Mediterranean Basin
  • capability of identifying the influences among cultures developed in the wider area of the Black Sea and the Eastern Mediterranean Basin
  • familiarity with issues such as the dating of a Byzantine and/or an Islamic architectural monument or work of art and its study within the historical and archaeological context.

Students will take part in the excavation organised by the International Hellenic University, where they will become familiar with the fundamental principles of the excavation procedure, as well as identifying, cataloguing, and studying the archaeological material. Furthermore, the participants will have the chance to see the cleaning and preservation of the artefacts. Finally, students will practice the procedure of drawing the trial trenches, as well as the ancient objects that will be found.

Learning outcomes

Upon completing the course the students will have gained:

  • knowledge of the excavation methods, the stratigraphic representation of excavation sections and findings and also the preservation and the recording of the artefacts
  • knowledge of the terminology and the study of archaeological findings
  • experience in field practice on excavation methods
  • an understanding of the needs of a modern excavation
  • Moreover, students will have the opportunity for practice through placements in museums and archaeological sites.

Click here to learn more about the IHU Excavation →

International Relations and History Stream

– Stream Elective Courses (4 out of 7)

The course examines conflicting nationalisms in the areas of the Northern Black Sea, the Caucasus and the Eastern Mediterranean by introducing the students to the historical background that led to the formation and delineation of nation-states in these areas, the role nationalism played in political discussions in the Soviet Union, Turkey and Greece at the beginning of the 20th century and how nationalism polarized the political discourse leading to never-ending conflicts. The course initially focuses on the Soviet Union and the “Nationalities question”, the national delineation policies followed by Moscow and the formations of the Ukrainian SSR and the Transcaucasian SFSR, until the latter’s subsequent dissolution in 1936 with the Soviet Constitution. The formations of the nation-states of Georgian SSR, Armenian SSR and Azerbaijan SSR is closely examined, together with their inherent problematic issues that would provoke local nationalisms in the future. Next, the course passes into concurrent times by examining the 2008 Russo-Georgian War, linking it with the deeper historical causes for its outbreak. The military operations are presented briefly together with an analysis of the consequences on Georgia itself and on the wider international and geopolitical level. Following the Russo-Georgian war, the course looks at the other major conflict that afflicts the region of South Caucasus: The Azero-Armenian conflict over Nagorno-Karabakh (1st war in 1988-1994 and 2nd war in 2020) is still an open wound for the region and one that needs to be studied as a case where local narratives collide with Great Power policies in the region. The course also examines the other great war that broke out within the post-Soviet space, between Ukraine and Russia, since 2014, and particularly after its flare-up, in 2022. As in the case of the Russo-Georgian War, the deepest causes are analyzed and discussed with the students together with the wider consequences in international relations. The course also looks at another great clash of nationalisms, this time not in post-soviet space but in the area of the Eastern Mediterranean. A background of the Graeco-Turkish wars is provided to the students since the independence of the Greek state in 1830 and the invasion of Cyprus is discussed. The students become familiar with the interests of the Great Powers over the island of Cyprus and become aware of how the discovery of natural resources in the area turned the Eastern Mediterranean into a Sea of Contention between Greece, Turkey and Cyprus.

The course begins with an examination of the awakening of Arab nationalism, on the one hand, and Zionism, on the other, in the last quarter of the 19th c., both in Europe and in the Ottoman Empire and of the position the lands of Israel/Palestine had it in their respective narratives. It then looks at the period of the British mandate and rule in Jerusalem and the adjacent areas, from the Balfour declaration to its end, after WWII. It is during this period that nationalist militant groups on both sides are formed and the first international decision (UN Resolution 181) is made, to nationally delineate the lands of Palestine. With the British withdrawal in 1948 the armed conflict begins, with the first war setting the foundations of the state of Israel. The success of the latter questions the philosophical premises of the secular Arab nationalist movements together with their stance towards the West. The period of decolonization of the region signaled the ever increasing influence of the US and the rising tensions between Arab and Zionist movements in the area. The latter peaked on multiple occasions (1967, 1973 wars), while the Soviet Union tried to take advantage of the rift between Arab nationalism and western policies in the region. The failed attempts made by secular autocratic regimes in the Arab world to address social conditions and to roll-back Israeli gains in the region gradually brought to the surface Islamic political movements, which grappled with social issues of the Arab world and with the issue of Israel’s policies in Palestine. This Islamic reaction peaked in the late 2000s and throughout the 2010s and was precipitated by a revolution, initiated by progressive secular Arab movements, which toppled the previous autocratic but secular regimes in the Arab world and paved the way for the temporary prevalence of the better organized Islamic movements, across the region.

The course examines the historically rich Hellenic heritage of the Greek people in the Black Sea area, mostly focusing on the thriving political, social and economic activities of the Greeks in the cities of southern Russia since the 18th century, and the respective topics in the Pontus area. The course will also examine the Greek presence on the western coast of the Black Sea and expand to the Greek presence in the Eastern Mediterranean, particularly in Egypt and the Levant, as well as in Central Asia, where most of the Hellenic populations were transferred during Soviet times.

Learning outcomes

Upon completing the course the students will have gained:

  • critical awareness of the theoretical concerns regarding minorities and immigration in the Black Sea region
  • knowledge of the impact Hellenic migration had on the economy and society of the region
  • ability to read, analyze and communicate orally sources and documents related to Greek immigration and minorities.

Since the end of the Cold War and propelled by the rise of China and its inclusion in global financial and political institutions, (European) West & (Chinese) East interaction has entered everyday vocabulary and discussions (nowadays fuelled even more due to the Chinese One Belt One Road Project – abbreviated as OBOR or the “New Silk Road”), giving rise to the concept of Eurasia as an interlinked continent, in which the Black Sea – Eastern Mediterranean complex has a pivotal position. In this context, not only China and Europe, but also the US, Russia and other major or minor players are entering the stage of a new “Great Game”, where international competition co-exists with international cooperation and Great Powers are faced with overlapping economic, energy and security policies.

The course places this modern discussion on the Silk Road and on the Black Sea/Eastern Mediterranean region’s special role in two complementary contexts, with the aim to enhance its understanding on the part of the student and to open up new fields of research:

  • the first frame is the context provided by the theory of Classical Geopolitics, through which the student acquires the necessary analytical tools by which to approach modern narrations on East & West interaction, trans-Eurasian Trade and Energy transfer corridors as well as current Security Dilemmas. Both the Black Sea and Eastern Mediterranean are central to these overlapping projects and Classical Geopolitics theory helps in understanding why.
  • the second frame is that of History: The Black Sea/Eastern Mediterranean region, as a geographical and cultural complex, has always been a hub of the East-West interaction and a focal point of competition between Great Powers,  already from Ancient times. This part of the course aims at urging the students to explore these past aspects by presenting to them international bibliography’s latest findings and information found on translated into English sources.

At the end of the course the students will be familiar with modern and historical aspects of Eurasian integration attempts, while being able to implement Classical Geopolitics as a tool for analysis for contemporary international developments, particularly in western Eurasia, in the areas of the Black Sea and the Eastern Mediterranean.

The course deals with the story of Political Islam in the Eastern Mediterranean and Black Sea countries. The term Political Islam usually includes a wide range of political movements different from each other but having in common a strong relation with the Islamic political tradition, that is, at times, but not always, accompanied by a vague desire for a return to some alleged forms of the “original” Islam of the Prophet’s time.

The analysis of the Islamic movements that have appeared in the region of the Eastern Mediterranean will include both the older, with their clearly anti-colonial character, and the most recent, that claim the ideal of an Islamic management of private life and political life in a modern society.

Learning outcomes

Upon completing the course the students will have gained:

  • detailed knowledge of the history of these movements
  • ability to understand the role and the importance of these movements in the Eastern Mediterranean region
  • ability to interpret the nature, the ideology, the purposes and the practices of these movements
  • familiarity with the concepts of Islamic fundamentalism, Islamic reformism, Islamism, Political Islam, Islamic resistance, contemporary jihad, and others
  • in-depth study of many of the most important expressions of these movements, like the Muslim Brotherhood (also known as the Muslim Brothers), Hizb ut-Tahrir etc.

Students are initially introduced into the concepts of conflict, violence, war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide. The students are then required to study an array of mass violence phenomena, starting from the Armenian Genocide and moving into other atrocities of the 20th c., such as the Ukrainian Holodomor or the Al Naqba and the Arab-Israeli conflict, the Holocaust, and the pogroms against the Greeks of Istanbul. The course also takes into consideration the most recent atrocities during the events following the “Arab Spring”, against Christian and Yazidi populations in the Middle East. The course focuses on common patterns of these tragic events and on the methodology of their historical documentation, touching upon the impact on current political affairs in the Eastern Mediterranean and Black Sea region: How are deep, divisive conflicts remembered after they have ended? What is their influence on current politics? How can reconciliation emerge and under what conditions? What is the role of external forces in the violent past of this region and what are the responsibilities of local elites in preserving such rivalries?

Learning outcomes:

Upon completing the course, the students will have gained:

  • knowledge of the basic theoretical and analytical concepts of the study of violence and conflict
  • familiarity with the geographic, demographic, and historical consequences of the genocidal conflicts and ethnic cleansing of the Black Sea and Eastern Mediterranean. area during the modern period and
  • ability to use this knowledge to explain the status of these regions.

Students will undertake a three-month practical internship in relevant historical archives conducting original historical research or assessing and classifying already existing archival sources. They will be assessed by a research paper they will produce.

Learning outcomes

Upon completing the course the students will have gained:

  • knowledge of archival research methods, the preservation and the recording of oral testimonies
  • knowledge of the terminology and the study of historical findings
  • field practice in oral history methods
  • understanding of the needs of modern historical research
  • Moreover, students will have the opportunity for practice through placements in museums and historical archives.

Third Semester

The Dissertation

As a part of the MA programme, students work on a subject relating to their academic interests and stream specialisation. The Master’s dissertation provides a good opportunity to apply theory and concepts learned in different courses to a Black Sea related issue or challenge. The Master’s dissertation tests students’ ability both to apply a certain methodology and approach in the analysis of a given problem and to demonstrate reasonably original research or fieldwork.

A member of the academic faculty supervises students throughout their projects. The supervision is delivered through face-to-face meetings at the University and through the e-learning platform of the University.

Open Source Lecture

Attend an open source lecture of our Master Programme “MA in Black Sea and Eastern Mediterranean Studies: Culture and International Relations”.

Course: “Historical Geography and Cartography of the Black Sea in Antiquity”. Lecture title: “The ancient Greeks in the Black Sea”. (Video)

IHU Educational Archaeological Excavation

Please click here to visit the excavation website

Schedule

The MA in “Black Sea and Eastern Mediterranean Studies: Culture and International Relations”, is a 3-semester full-time programme of study. It is taught mainly on weekdays over three-hour teaching periods. The first two semesters cover the core courses of the programme. Each teaching term has 13 teaching weeks followed by a 10-day exam period. The third period is taken up with work on the Master’s dissertation. The programme is also available in part-time mode and in distance learning mode.

The Academic Faculty

Manolis Manoledakis Professor of Classical Archaeology / International Hellenic University Dean of the School of Humanities, Social Studies and Economics

Director of the MA in “Black Sea and Eastern Mediterranean Studies: Culture and International Relations”

+30 230807537

m.manoledakis@ihu.edu.gr

Stefanos Kordosis Assistant Professor in History of Central Eurasia from the Black Sea to China / International Hellenic University +30 2310807570

s.kordosis@ihu.edu.gr

Eleni Mentesidou Academic Scholar / International Hellenic University
+30 2310807508

ementesidou@ihu.edu.gr

Trisevgeni Papadakou Academic Scholar / International Hellenic University tpapadakou@ihu.edu.gr
Nikos Giannakopoulos Associate Professor of Ancient History / National and Kapodistrian University of Athens +30 210 727 7448
giannakn@arch.uoa.gr
Nikos Michailidis Adjunct Lecturer, Visiting Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Modern Greek Culture, University of Missouri–St. Louis nmichailidis76@gmail.com
Andrew S. Cooper Adjunct Lecturer (Non-Resident Scholar at the Middle East Institute, Washington D.C., PhD Victoria University Wellington, MSc Columbia University/University of Aberdeen) acooper@ihu.gr
René Wildangel Adjunct Lecturer (previous posts held: Fellow at European Council on Foreign Relations – https://ecfr.eu/profile/rene_wildangel/ – Senior Advisor in the Bundestag) rwildangel@ihu.edu.gr
Georgia Aristodimou Adjunct Lecturer g.aristodemou@ihu.edu.gr
Flora Karagianni Adjunct Lecturer flkaragianni@gmail.com
Theodosis Kyriakidis Adjunct Lecturer, Research Fellow (Pontic Studies) +30 2310 997214

tkyriakidis@ihu.gr

Fees & Financing

Fees

The programme fees for the MA in “Black Sea and Eastern Mediterranean Studies: Culture and International Relations” is 2500€. The amount is payable in two instalments for the full time mode or in four instalments for the part time mode at the beginning of each semester. The fees are also eligible for financing through LAEK – OAED programme.

Deposits

If you have been accepted to a postgraduate programme, you will need to make a payment of the deposit of 500 Euros to secure your place. This amount will count towards the first instalment of your tuition fees. The deposit is non-refundable once you have commenced your studies at the IHU. Prior to that, a refund can be made but a 20% administrative fee will be retained. The deposit can be paid by bank transfer or bank draft. Credit card payments can be made through electronic banking (contact your Bank as handling fees may apply).

*For non-EU students, an advance payment of 1.250 Euros out of 2.500 Euros towards the tuition fees must be paid.

Scholarships

The School of Humanities, Social Sciences and Economics offers a number of scholarships for the programmes it offers, covering a significant proportion of the fees. These scholarships are competitive. Award criteria include the quality of the first degree, the undergraduate grades of the candidate, his/her command of the English language and overall profile. Candidates for scholarships should include a separate letter with their application documents in which they request to be considered for a scholarship, stating the reasons why they think they qualify.

For more information click here

Scholarships

“Anna Theophylaktou” and “Charalampos Kianchidis” scholarships for the academic year 2023-2024.

The MA in “Black Sea and Eastern Mediterranean Studies: Culture and International Relations” and Efxeinos Leschi of Thessaloniki announce the “Anna Theophylaktou” and “Charalampos Kianchidis” scholarships for the academic year 2023-2024 providing full fee coverage for candidates who hold a university degree (written evidence from the graduating University is required) and who are interested in pursuing their dissertation in subjects concerning Hellenism in the Black Sea Countries. Interested candidates need to indicate on their application form (section: FUNDING ARRANGEMENTS, p. 4) which scholarship they are applying for (only one of the two is permissible per application).

Academic scholarships

In case the total applications’ number exceeds the number of the available scholarships, candidates will be shortlisted by the school based on academic criteria and, if required, by an interview by members of its faculty staff.

To be eligible for the scholarship, you need to provide evidence of a first class bachelor degree or an official document from the School that you have been among the top 5% of the graduates of your class.

For more information, please contact: Assistant Professor Stefanos Kordosis (+30 2310 807570, s.kordosis@ihu.edu.gr)

Sevastos Kyminitisscholarship for the academic year 2023-2024

The MA in “Black Sea and Eastern Mediterranean Studies: Culture and International Relations” and Pampondian Federation of Greece announce the “Sevastos Kyminitis scholarship” for the academic year 2023-2024 providing full fee coverage for candidates who hold a university degree (written evidence from the graduating University is required). The scholarship is intended to support students who are interested in pursuing their dissertation in subjects concerning Pontian Hellenism. Candidates, who are (or were in the past) members of student Pontian Associations, or members of Associations of the Pampondian Federation of Greece, or members of Associations of Pontian Federations from abroad have an advantage. Such candidates are required to procure a certification of membership from their respective association to accompany their application and need to state in the application form (section: FUNDING ARRANGEMENTS, p. 4) that they apply for the scholarship.

In case the total applications’ number exceeds the number of the available scholarships, candidates will be shortlisted by the school based on academic criteria and, if required, by an interview by members of its faculty staff.

For more information, please contact: Assistant Professor Stefanos Kordosis (+30 2310 807570, s.kordosis@ihu.edu.gr) and Academic Scholar Dr. Eleni Mentesidou (+30 2310 807508, ementesidou@ihu.edu.gr).

Programme announcement – Admissions

The next intake in the MA in Black Sea and Eastern Mediterranean Studies: Culture and International Relations starts in October 2024. Interested parties are invited to submit their application by 31 August 2024 (non-Greek applicants) / 30 September 2024 (Greek applicants) or until places are filled, by following instructions at the applications page.

Programme announcement:
First intake: ENG | GR
Second intake: ENG | GR

Program Digital Archaeology

Program of the Center of Education and Lifelong learning of the International Hellenic University

Ideal career path

The MA programme offers a critical and multifarious study of the Black Sea and the Eastern Mediterranean region, from ancient history and archaeology to art, politics, international relations and modern diplomacy. Depending on the stream chosen, the graduates develop the competence and the ability to comprehend and discuss various aspects of ancient life in the Black Sea and Eastern Mediterranean regions, from artifacts of ancient art to ancient textual sources, or to understand current international relations in the region, and their political, economic and historical background. The skills obtained allow them to work in: Educational Institutions and Academies concentrating on Black Sea and Eastern Mediterranean studies, Archaeological Departments and Research Institutes, Museums, News Media, Geopolitical Risk Assessment/Analysis & Solutions Services or in other state services, IGOs and private corporations which operate or have interests in the Black Sea and the Eastern Mediterranean.

Weekly Timetables

Quality Assurance Policy

Evaluation Reports

Student Ombudsman

Research Ethics Regulation

Location

The MA in Black Sea and Eastern Mediterranean Studies takes place in the facilities of the School of Humanities, Social Sciences and Economics of the University Center of International Programmes of Studies of the International Hellenic University in Thermi-Thessaloniki.

Contact

Postal address:
School of Humanities, Social Sciences and Economics
Department of School of Humanities, Social Sciences and Economics
University Center of International Programmes of Studies
14th km Thessaloniki – Nea Moudania 570 01 Thermi, Thessaloniki, Greece

Tel: +30 2310 807 526/523/530

Εmail: infoshsse@ihu.edu.gr